Ceballos, Juan Bautista

Juan Bautista Loreto Mucio Francisco José de Asís de la Santísima Trinidad Ceballos Gómez Sañudo

b. 13 May 1811, Durango
d. 20 Aug 1859, Paris

Title: Presidente Provisional de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (Provisional President of the Mexican United States) [1]
Term: 6 Jan 1853 - 6 Feb 1853
Chronology: 6 Jan 1853, assumed the duties of the Constitutional President of the Mexican United States during the absence of the incumbent, private ceremony, Mexico City [2][3]
  6 Jan 1853, ceased to exercise the functions of office upon the installation of a successor [4]
Title: Presidente Interino de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (Interim President of the Mexican United States) [5]
Term: 6 Jan 1853 - 7 Feb 1853
Chronology: 6 Jan 1853, elected, session of the Cámara de Diputados (Chamber of Deputies), Mexico City [4]
  6 Jan 1853, took an oath of office, session of the Congreso General, salon de la Cámara de Diputados, Mexico City [4]
  7 Feb 1853, signed a letter of resignation (dated 7 Feb 1853, Mexico City) addressed to the military commanders designated in Art. 2 of Transitory Provisions to an agreement signed 6 Feb 1853 in Mexico City [6][7]
Biography:
Descendant of a prominent family in Durango; moved with his family to Valladolid (now Morelia) in 1819; studied law and graduated from the Colegio de San Nicolás Obispo (1835); elected a member of the Congreso Constituyente (1842) to represent the Department of Michoacán; was named a deputy of the Congreso elected in accordance with a law of 8 Jul 1845, but it failed to convene as a result of the revolution which toppled the government of José Joaquín de Herrera; served as a member of the Congreso Constituyente (1846-1847), representing the State of Michoacán; vice president of the Congreso (31 Dec 1846 - 30 Jan 1847); elected senator 3 May 1848 but requested a leave of absence because of his election as Constitutional Governor of the State of Michoacán (3 Jul 1848); held the office of the Constitutional Governor of the State of Michoacán (6 Jul 1848 - 7 Mar 1851); resigned the post of governor following his election as a member of the Supreme Court of Justice of the Mexican United States (resignation accepted 7 Mar 1851); member of the Supreme Court of Justice of the Mexican United States (1851-1853); elected president of the Supreme Court of Justice of the Mexican United States (1852-1853); assumed executive authority following the departure of President Mariano Arista (6 Jan 1853); elected Interim President of the Mexican United States (6 Jan 1853 - 7 Feb 1853); refused to support the accords signed by military commanders on 6 Feb 1853, promoting the Plan of Guadalajara (Plan del Hospicio, 20 Oct 1852) aimed at establishing the dictatorship of Antonio López de Santa Anna; resigned the office of Interim President (7 Feb 1853); elected a member of the Congreso Constituyente (1856-1857) by the State of Michoacán and Territory of Colima (opted for Michoacán); stood as a candidate at the election of President of the Mexican United States and President of the Supreme Court in 1857.
Biographical sources: birth and baptismal record: Andrade, p. 11; obituary: La Sociedad, No. 637, 1 Oct 1859, pp. 2-3.
Elections:

Candidate Votes of States (6 Jan 1853)
Juan Bautista Ceballos 17
Mariano Riva Palacio 2
Juan Nepomuceno Almonte 1
Juan Nepomuceno Álvarez Hurtado 1
Source of electoral results: El Siglo Diez y Nueve, No. 1,471, 7 Jan 1853, p. 1.

[1] The only documented use of this style is a decree of 6 Jan 1853, promulgating a congressional resolution of the same date with regard to the acceptance of the resignation of President Arista (Colección de las leyes, decretos y órdenes, expedidas por el Congreso Nacional, 1853, pp. 3-4).
[2] El Siglo Diez y Nueve, No. 1,471, 7 Jan 1853, p. 1; El Universal, No. 266, 7 Jan 1853, p. 3.
[3] Exercised the functions of chief executive between the departure of President Arista from Mexico City (at about 01:00 6 Jan 1853) and his own election and swearing-in as Interim President (at 19:30 6 Jan 1853) in accordance with Art. 98 of the Constitution of 1824 (as amended).
[4] El Siglo Diez y Nueve, No. 1,471, 7 Jan 1853, p. 1.
[5] Styled Presidente Constitucional Interino de la República in the resolution on his election passed by the Cámara de Diputados. Also in official use: Presidente Interino Constitucional de la República, Presidente Constitucional Interino de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, Presidente Interino de la República, Presidente de la República Mexicana.
[6] El Siglo Diez y Nueve, No. 1,503, 9 Feb 1853, p. 4.
[7] The response of the military commanders acknowledging the receipt of his letter is dated 7 Feb 1853, Mexico City, and is printed in El Siglo Diez y Nueve, No. 1503, 9 Feb 1853, p. 4.
Last updated on: 15 Feb 2015 09:59:18