Johnson, Lyndon

Lyndon Baines Johnson

b. 27 Aug 1908, on a farm near Stonewall, Gillespie County, Texas
d. 22 Jan 1973, near Johnson City, Texas

Title: President of the United States
Term: 22 Nov 1963 - 20 Jan 1965
Chronology: 6 Jan 1961, election to the office of Vice President of the United States is declared upon counting electoral votes (cast 19 Dec 1960), joint session of the Senate and House of Representatives, House Chamber, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [1]
20 Jan 1961, commencement of term
20 Jan 1961, took the oath prescribed by law, inaugural ceremony, East Portico, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [2]
22 Nov 1963, entered upon the duties of the office of President of the United States upon the death of an incumbent
22 Nov 1963, took an oath of office as President of the United States, private ceremony, conference room aboard VC-137C SAM 26000 aircraft ("Air Force One"), Dallas Love Field, Dallas County, Texas [3]
20 Jan 1965, expiration of term
Term: 20 Jan 1965 - 20 Jan 1969
Chronology: 6 Jan 1965, election to the office of President of the United States is declared upon counting electoral votes (cast 14 Dec 1964), joint session of the Senate and House of Representatives, House Chamber, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [4]
20 Jan 1965, commencement of term
20 Jan 1965, took an oath of office as President of the United States, inaugural ceremony, East Portico, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [5]
20 Jan 1969, expiration of term
Biography:
Attended the public schools of Blanco County, Texas; graduated from Southwest Texas State Teachers College at San Marcos in 1930; taught high school 1928-1931; served as secretary to Congressman Richard M. Kleberg in Washington, D.C., 1931-1935; attended the Georgetown University Law School, Washington, D.C., 1934; State director of the National Youth Administration of Texas 1935-1937; elected as a Democrat to the 75th Congress (10 Apr 1937) and reelected to the five succeeding Congresses (served 10 Apr 1937 - 3 Jan 1949); served as lieutenant commander in the US Navy 1941-1942; was not a candidate for renomination to the 81st Congress in 1948; elected to the US Senate (served 3 Jan 1949 - 3 Jan 1961); reelected in 1954 and 1960; Democratic whip 1951-1953; minority leader 1953-1955; majority leader (3 Jan 1955 - 3 Jan 1961); elected Vice President of the United States in 1960, on the Democratic ticket with John Kennedy; on the death of President Kennedy took the oath of office aboard the presidential plane, Air Force One, at Dallas' Love Field at 02:38 p.m. 22 Nov 1961; succeeded in convincing Congress to pass legislation concerning civil rights, tax reduction, an antipoverty program, and conservation; elected President of the United States in 1964 with an unprecedented popular majority of more than 15 million votes; succeeded in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 aimed against racial segregation and discrimination, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which outlawed the literacy tests used to prevent blacks from voting; increased U.S. intervention in South Vietnam leading to escalation of war; did not seek reelection in 1968; retired to his ranch near Johnson City, Texas.
Biographical sources: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (2005).
Elections:

Candidate (party) Electoral vote (19 Dec 1960)
Lyndon Baines Johnson (Democratic) 303
Henry Cabot Lodge (Republican) 219
James Strom Thurmond (Democratic) 14
Barry Morris Goldwater (Republican) 1
total number of electors appointed 537
number of votes for a majority 269

Candidate (party) Electoral vote (14 Dec 1964)
Lyndon Baines Johnson (Democratic) 486
Barry Morris Goldwater (Republican) 52
total number of electors appointed 538
number of votes for a majority 270
Source of electoral results: Congressional Record, 87th Congress, 1st Session, 291; Congressional Record, 89th Congress, 1st Session, 137.

[1] Congressional Record, 87th Congress, 1st Session, 287-291.
[2] Congressional Record, 87th Congress, 1st Session, 1010-1013.
[3] The New York Times, New York, Saturday, November 23, 1963, vol. CXIII, No. 38,654, p. 1.
[4] Congressional Record, 89th Congress, 1st Session, 136-137.
[5] Congressional Record, 89th Congress, 1st Session, 984-986.
Last updated on: 01 Jan 2012 14:19:07