Coolidge, Calvin

John Calvin Coolidge, Jr.

b. 4 Jul 1872, Plymouth, Windsor County, Vermont
d. 5 Jan 1933, 'The Beeches,' Northampton, Massachusetts

Title: President of the United States
Term: 2 Aug 1923 - 4 Mar 1925
Chronology: 9 Feb 1921, election to the office of Vice President of the United States is declared upon counting electoral votes (cast 10 Jan 1921), joint session of the Senate and House of Representatives, House Chamber, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [1]
4 Mar 1921, commencement of term
4 Mar 1921, took the oath prescribed by law, regular session of the Senate, Senate Chamber, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [2]
2 Aug 1923, entered upon the duties of the office of President of the United States upon the death of an incumbent
3 Aug 1923, took an oath of office as President of the United States, private ceremony, residence of John Calvin Coolidge, Sr., Plymouth, Vermont [3]
4 Mar 1925, expiration of term
Term: 4 Mar 1925 - 4 Mar 1929
Chronology: 11 Feb 1925, election to the office of President of the United States is declared upon counting electoral votes (cast 12 Jan 1925), joint session of the Senate and House of Representatives, House Chamber, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [4]
4 Mar 1925, commencement of term
4 Mar 1925, took an oath of office as President of the United States, inaugural ceremony as part of the special session of the Senate, East Portico, U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. [5]
4 Mar 1929, expiration of term
Biography:
Attended the public schools, Black River Academy, Ludlow, Vermont, and St. Johnsbury Academy; graduated from Amherst College, Massachusetts, in 1895; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1897 and commenced practice in Northampton, Massachusetts; member of the city council in 1899; city solicitor (1900-1902); clerk of courts in 1904; member of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts (1907-1908); resumed the practice of his profession in Northampton; elected mayor of Northampton in 1910 and 1911; member of the Senate of Massachusetts (1912-1915), and served as president of that body (1914-1915); lieutenant governor of Massachusetts (1916-1918); Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (2 Jan 1919 - 6 Jan 1921); elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Warren Harding in 1920 on a Return to Normalcy platform; entered upon the duties 4 Mar 1921, and served until 2 Aug 1923; upon the death of Harding became President of the United States (2 Aug 1923); was sworn in by his father, a justice of the peace and a notary, in his family's sitting room in his rural home in Plymouth, Vermont (at 02:47 3 Aug 1923); elected President of the United States for the term 1925-1929, using the slogan Keep Cool with Coolidge; presidency was distinguished by absence of crises, lack of spectacular political leadership, and the expansion of apparent prosperity; supported noninterference in the affairs of business and industry; twice vetoed the McNary-Haugen farm relief bills (1927, 1928); was not a candidate for renomination in 1928; served as chairman of the Nonpartisan Railroad Commission and as honorary president of the Foundation of the Blind.
Biographical sources: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (2005).
Elections:

Candidate (party) Electoral vote (10 Jan 1921)
John Calvin Coolidge (Republican) 404
Franklin Delano Roosevelt (Democratic) 127
total number of electors appointed 531
number of votes for a majority 266

Candidate (party) Electoral vote (12 Jan 1925)
John Calvin Coolidge (Republican) 382
John William Davis (Democratic) 136
Robert Marion LaFollette (Progressive) 13
total number of electors appointed 531
number of votes for a majority 266
Source of electoral results: Congressional Record, 66th Congress, 3rd Session, 2868; Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 2nd Session, 3510.

[1] Congressional Record, 66th Congress, 3rd Session, 2868-2869.
[2] Congressional Record, 66th Congress, 3rd Session, 4532.
[3] The New York Times, New York, Friday, August 3, 1923, vol. LXXII, No. 23,932, p. 1.
[4] Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 2nd Session, 3509-3510.
[5] Congressional Record, 69th Congress, Special Session of the Senate, 3-7.
  Image: photograph (between 1919 and 1921).
Last updated on: 24 Dec 2011 09:55:33