Pearse, Patrick Henry (Mac Piarais, Pádraig)

Pádraig Anraí Mac Piarais = Patrick Henry Pearse

b. 10 Nov 1879, Dublin
d. 3 May 1916, Dublin

Title: Uachtarán ar Rialtais Shealadaigh na hÉireann = President of the Provisional Government of the Irish Republic
Term: 24 Apr 1916 - 29 Apr 1916
Chronology: 24 Apr 1916, elected, meeting of the Military Council, Dublin
29 Apr 1916, captured by the British troops

Son of an English sculptor and his Irish wife; educated in a private school, at the Christian Brothers School in Westland Row; graduated as lawyer from the Royal University of Ireland; joined the Gaelic League in 1895; became the League's president and editor of its newspaper, "An Claidheamh Soluis" ("The Sword of Light"); in September 1908 founded a bilingual school in Ranelagh, near Dublin, to promote Irish language and culture; published a collection of Irish tales and his own poems; joined the Irish Volunteers (1913) and became a member of their provisional committee; was co-opted to the Volunteers' Supreme Council (July 1914); joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood (1915), which secretly controlled the Volunteers' central executive, and was one of the leaders of extreme Nationalist section of this organization; together with Tom Clarke and several other leaders of the Irish Republican Brotherhood planned the Easter Rising against British government; on Easter Monday (24 Apr 1916) the Military Council, set up by the rebels, elected Pearse president of the Provisional Government; on the same day he announced the establishment of the Irish Republic from the steps of Dublin General Post Office and the Rising began; after a week's fighting he and his supporters agreed to an unconditional surrender "to prevent further slaughter of Dublin citizens"; was court-martialled, condemned to death, and executed by a firing squad in Kilmainham Jail (3 May 1916). Biography source: [1][2]

[1] "A Dictionary of Irish Biography", ed. by Henry Boylan (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, 1998).
[2] "Patrick H. Pearse", by Desmond Ryan (Dublin, 1932).
Image: photograph, c. 1916.
Last updated on: 24 May 2010 22:32:03