Afghanistan: Heads of State: 1843-1880 - Archontology.org

Afghanistan: Heads of State: 1843-1880

Amīr (امیر) [1]
Apr/May 1843 - 9 Jun 1863 Dūst Muḥammad Khān (دوست محمد خان) [2]
12 Jun 1863 - 22 Feb 1879 Shīr ‘Alī Khān (شیر/شېر علی خان) [3]
25 May 1866 - 4 Oct 1867 Muḥammad Afz̤al Khān (محمد افضل خان) [4]
11 Oct 1867 - Oct 1868 Muḥammad A‘ẓam Khān (محمد اعظم خان) [5]
Mar 1879 - 28 Oct 1879 Muḥammad Ya‘qūb Khān (محمد یعقوب خان) [6]
Dec 1879 - Apr 1880 Muḥammad Mūsá Khān (محمد موسى خان) [7]

[1] tbd
[2] After a period of exile forced by the government of British India, Dūst Muḥammad Khān returned to Afghanistan in the spring of 1843. According to newspaper reports published in Indian press, he reached Jalalabad c. 19 Apr 1843 and then proceeded to Kabul.
[3] Publicly proclaimed ruler in Herat on 12 Jun 1863 and entered Kabul in Sep 1863. While on a military campaign, he lost Kabul which was occupied by the revolting regional army of Turkestan in Mar 1866. Shīr ‘Alī Khān retained control over Kandahar (except for 1867-1868) and Herat, eventually re-capturing Kabul on 11 Sep 1868. Before Kabul was occupied by the invading British army, Shīr ‘Alī Khān fled from the capital (13 Dec 1878) and moved to Mazar-i-Sharif where he died on 22 Feb 1879.
[4] Publicly proclaimed ruler in Kabul on 25 May 1866, extending the territory under his control to Kandahar in Jan 1867.
[5] Publicly proclaimed ruler in Kabul on 11 Oct 1867. While on a military campaign in Ghazni, he lost control of Kabul (21 Aug 1868) and was forced to flee from the territory of Afghanistan (Oct 1868).
[6] Succeeded Shīr ‘Alī Khān in Kabul. The intention of Muḥammad Ya‘qūb Khān to abdicate was made known to the British military authority on 12 Oct 1879 and was publicly proclaimed in Kabul by the British on 28 Oct 1879.
[7] Muḥammad Mūsá Khān, a minor son of Muḥammad Ya‘qūb Khān, was proclaimed ruler in Ghazni in Dec 1879 (most probably between 20 Dec 1879 and 27 Dec 1879) by a group of nobles resisting the British invasion of Afghanistan. The claim virtually failed after the occupation of Ghazni by the British army on 20 Apr 1880.
Last updated on: 17 Oct 2021 12:54:41